The Rogue Folk Club presents

David Francey

 
OCT
28

2011

 
08
00
PM
 

ST JAMES HALL i

3214 West 10th Ave, Kitsilano

Accessible All ages

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he's the closest thing this country has to Woody Guthrie – Georgia Straight

From carpenter to songwriter - Since leaving construction and recording Torn Screen Door in 1999 Scottish-born Canadian, David Francey is recognized as one of today's finest singer-songwriters. Francey has released 8 CDs. His most recent is Seaway - a collaboration with Mike Ford of Moxy Fruvous fame with songs based on their voyage on the M.V. Algoville. Francey's CD, Right of Passage, earned him his third Juno in less than 5 years. Francey also had the honour of receiving the prestigious SOCAN Folk Music Award.

David Francey was born in 1954 in Ayrshire, Scotland, where as a paper boy he got his first taste of the working life. He learned to read at an early age, and by age eleven was devouring the newspapers he delivered. This helped establish his interest in politics and world events while developing the social conscience that forms the backdrop of his songs.

He was twelve when his family immigrated to Toronto. He says he can trace his love of the land, the history, and the people of his adopted country to weekend family drives exploring southern Ontario. Music played a large part in these family outings. They sang traditional Scottish tunes as they drove through the Canadian countryside. Dad and sister Muriel sang melody, while mother and David sang harmonies.

His attachment to Canada grew with travel. He hitched across the country three times, then thumbed his way to the Yukon. This attachment surfaces in his songs of rail lines, farms, and the St. Lawrence Seaway. He grew to understand the people while working in Toronto train yards, the Yukon bush, and as a carpenter in the Eastern Townships. These experiences colour his first CD, Torn Screen Door, with songs like Hard Steel Mill, Gypsy Boys, and Working Poor and his second, Far End of Summer, with Highway, Flowers of Saskatchewan and February Morning Drive.

In concert David is a singer and a storyteller. His wry humour and astute observations combined with his openhearted singing style have earned him a loyal following.